Leadership and Peer Support,
Grade 11, Open (GPP3O)

Starting in September 2003, cadets who successfully complete all the requirements for the Red, Silver and Gold Star qualifications, will be awarded the full Grade 11 credit - Leadership and Peer Support (GPP30). The information below is taken from the Ontario Ministry of Education Curriculum documentation.

Introduction

This course prepares and motivates students to provide leadership and assistance to others in their schools and communities. Students will develop skills in communication, interpersonal relations, coaching, leadership, teamwork, and conflict management, and apply them in roles such as tutoring, mentoring, and student council involvement. Students will also learn the value and complexity of social diversity, while acquiring an appreciation of the importance of contributing to their communities and helping others throughout their lives.

Prerequisite: Career Studies, Grade 10, Open

Personal Knowledge and Management Skills

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain how their aspirations, competencies, talents, temperaments, and characteristics may affect their interactions with others;
  • identify criteria for assessing the effectiveness of individuals in leadership and peer support roles and use these criteria to assess their own leadership and peer support capabilities;
  • identify and effectively use the personal management skills and characteristics required to succeed in leadership and peer support roles;
  • demonstrate an understanding of effective learning strategies for use in tutoring and mentoring roles;
  • demonstrate an understanding of barriers to effective learning and of school and community resources available to address these barriers.

Specific Expectations

Learning and Thinking Strategies

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of a range of effective learning strategies (e.g., study, research, note-taking, and recall strategies) that can be applied to helping others learn;
  • identify and describe barriers to effective learning (e.g., emotional barriers, motivational barriers, learning disabilities);
  • explain how to recognize barriers to learning in others and how to determine their own role in helping others address these barriers;
  • describe school and community programs and services available to support students’ needs (e.g., guidance services, social service agencies, mentorship programs) and explain how to access them.

Personal Knowledge

By the end of this course, students will:

  • produce a personal profile that describes how they interact with others and how others see them, using a variety of assessment techniques (e.g., personality inventories, feedback from others) that identify personal characteristics such as interests, skills, emotional intelligence, and temperament;
  • identify and describe the leadership style that is best suited to their personality profile;
  • explain how a variety of factors (e.g., culture, family background, personal experiences, the media) have influenced their motivation and skills related to support and leadership roles;
  • describe a set of criteria to assess the effectiveness of individuals in leadership and peer support roles and use these criteria to assess their own strengths and needs for further development.

Personal Management

By the end of this course, students will:

  • identify the personal management skills and personal characteristics that are needed to be effective in leadership and peer support roles;
  • demonstrate the effective use of personal management skills in a variety of leadership and peer support roles;
  • identify and describe personal management strategies that contribute to academic success (e.g., strategies for dealing with homework, tests, missed classes, work load, procrastination) and demonstrate how to communicate these strategies in tutoring and mentoring roles;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the principles and protocols related to confidentiality and privacy rights and their relevance to leadership and peer support roles.

Interpersonal Knowledge and Skills

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of and use theories and strategies related to positive and healthy interpersonal relationships;
  • demonstrate an understanding of and use theories and strategies related to effective communication;
  • demonstrate an understanding of theories and strategies related to leadership and group dynamics and use these to help individuals and diverse groups achieve their goals;
  • demonstrate an understanding of how community diversity and individual rights and responsibilities affect leadership and peer support roles.

Specific Expectations

Interpersonal Relations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of positive relationships and of the early signs of an abusive relationship;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the elements of good mental health;
  • describe the elements of effective interpersonal relations (e.g., respect for differences, flexibility, honesty, integrity) and demonstrate their use in selected leadership and peer support roles in the school or community;
  • describe a conflict resolution model and demonstrate its use in a variety of situations to reduce conflict and reach mutually agreeable solutions;
  • define and explain concepts (e.g., bias, stereotyping, prejudice) and contemporary social problems (e.g., substance abuse, poverty, violence) that denote barriers to individual success, and identify strategies to address these barriers;
  • identify the types and sources of pressure on adolescents (e.g., peer pressure, family tensions, media influence), describe the behaviours that may result, and identify appropriate strategies to deal with pressure.

Communication Skills

By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain the benefits and pitfalls of expressing emotions and demonstrate appropriate ways of managing their own emotions and responding to others’ expressions of emotions;
  • describe the elements of effective communication (e.g., active listening, non-judgemental statements, paraphrasing) and demonstrate their use in selected leadership and peer support roles in the school or community (e.g., tutoring, mentoring, coaching, mediating, assisting with school or community projects);
  • use feedback effectively and appropriately to help others identify their strengths and areas needing improvement;
  • demonstrate an understanding of how to respond appropriately to peers’ disclosures of serious personal matters (e.g., health problems, physical and emotional abuse, family issues, harassment, substance abuse).

Group Dynamics

By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain how cultural background may affect communication, interpersonal relations, and leadership styles;
  • demonstrate the skills required to help others define and achieve their goals (e.g., action planning, coaching);
  • describe theories of group dynamics (e.g., theories describing stages of group development, roles of group members) and produce an analysis of the dynamics of groups in which they participate;
  • describe a variety of team-building strategies and explain how they facilitate positive interaction and improve group and individual results;
  • explain how selected leadership styles and strategies affect group interaction and results;
  • identify skills of effective leadership (e.g., building consensus, identifying and using strengths of group members) and demonstrate their use in classroom groups and in planning school or community events.

Connecting With the Community

By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe the dimensions of diversity within their community (e.g., gender, culture, race, ability, age, religion, socio-economic level) and identify the value of diversity as well as the challenges it poses;
  • describe their rights and responsibilities as a part of a community whose members come from diverse backgrounds;
  • identify how their rights and responsibilities and those of others influence the ways they perform various leadership and peer support roles;
  • explain how power can be used positively or misused in work, family, and peer contexts and identify strategies to deal with situations where power is misused (e.g., gang aggression, child abuse, workplace harassment);
  • describe the causes and costs to individuals, families, and communities of discrimination, harassment, violence, and poverty, using appropriate documentation and statistical information;
  • describe a personal vision of a just and equitable society and propose means of addressing social and individual problems.

Exploration of Opportunities

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate the effective use of data-gathering techniques and print, electronic, and human resources to identify leadership and peer support opportunities in the school and the community;
  • demonstrate the effective use of program design techniques to design peer support/leadership programs to address needs they have identified in the school;
  • evaluate their own suitability for selected leadership and peer support opportunities (e.g., fundraising, peer mentoring, tutoring).

Specific Expectations

Accessing and Managing Information

By the end of this course, students will:

  • produce a comprehensive list of the leadership and peer support opportunities available in their school and community, using print, electronic, and human resources;
  • demonstrate the ability to use desktop publishing or other appropriate software in accessing and managing information (e.g., to produce marketing materials promoting school events or peer support programs);
  • produce and present effective proposals (e.g., for the development of new peer support programs or for soliciting support from community partners).

Trends and Opportunities

By the end of this course, students will:

  • describe selected peer support roles (e.g., tutoring, mentoring) in terms of responsibilities of the role, skills required, time commitments, and benefits and challenges for the volunteer, and evaluate their own suitability for these opportunities;
  • demonstrate the ability to design and use a needs assessment questionnaire to identify the types of support needed in their school;
  • demonstrate the ability to design programs to meet identified needs (e.g., welcoming students who are new to the school);
  • demonstrate the ability to design and use an evaluation tool to assess the programs that they have designed;
  • explain how experience in leadership and peer support roles at school and in the community can help them achieve their future occupational and community involvement goals.

ISBN 0-7778-9190-5
00-033
© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2000

Last Updated: Thursday April 28, 2016 03:39 PM