Honours Awarded
To Old Boys and Staff
For Services in the Field in World War II

Most medal images and information from the Veterans Affairs Canada Website. 
Link to the Veterans Affairs Web Site Home Page
Companion of the Order of the Bath


Major General C. S. L. Hertzberg, CB, MC, VD
Major General H. F. H. Hertzberg, CB, DSO, MC
 

The Most Honourable And Ancient Order Of The Bath was presented for service of the highest calibre. The order has a civil and a military division with three levels in each division: Knight Grand Cross (GCB); Knight Commander (KCB); and Companion (CB). The first two levels confer knighthood, and since 1935, have not been available to anyone retaining Canadian Citizenship. The Companion level was presented to the military for service in WWII and one was presented to a Canadian in Korea.
Distinguished Service Order


Lieutenant Colonel A. G. Chubb, DSO, CD
Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Eaton, DSO, OBE
Major R.J. Graham, DSO
Reginald Edward Alfred Morton, DSO
John Godfrey Spragge, DSO

Distinguished Service OrderThe order was established for rewarding individual instances of meritorious or distinguished service in war. This is a military order for officers only, and while normally given for service under fire or under conditions equivalent to service in actual combat with the enemy, it was awarded between 1914 and 1916 under circumstances which could not be regarded as under fire. After 01 January 1917, commanders in the field were instructed to recommend this award only for those serving under fire. Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone Mentioned in Dispatches. The order is generally given to officers in command, above the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and awards to ranks below this are usually for a high degree of gallantry just short of deserving the Victoria Cross. A bar is awarded for an act which would have earned the order in the first place. The bar is plain gold with an Imperial Crown in the centre. The year of the award is engraved on the reverse. 
Commander of the Order 
of the British Empire

Brigadier J. F. Bingham, CBE, CD
Brigadier A. E. Duncanson, CBE, DSO, VD
Brigadier R. O. G. Morton, CBE, CD
Air Commodore G. S. O'Brian, CBE, AFC (Staff)

Officer of the Order 
of the British Empire

Group Captain A. K. Aspden, OBE
Lieutenant Colonel D. D. Carrick, OBE
George Taylor Denison, OBE
Colonel W. C. Dick, OBE
Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Eaton, DSO, OBE
Reginald Arthur Harvey Galbraith, OBE
Lieutenant Colonel M. E, Isbester, OBE, MC
Brigadier C. J. Laurin, OBE, OStJ, CD
Honorary Group Captain G. O. Lightbourn, OBE
Commander K.S. MacLachlan, OBE
Group Captain D. Massey, OBE
Group Captain R. G. McGregor, OBE
Colonel L.C. Montgomery, OBE, MC, VD
Surgeon Commander H. S. Morton, OBE, CD
Group Captain D. S. Patterson, OBE
John Godfrey Spragge, OBE

Member of the Order 
of the British Empire

Lieutenant Colonel G. T. Cassels, MBE, MC
Major D. R. Ely, MBE
Major A. R. Kilgour, MBE
Lieutenant Colonel W. L. Lovering, MBE
Wing Commander J. L. Walmsley, MBE
Murray GA White, MBE

Officer of the Order of the British EmpireWith WWI lasting longer than expected and no suitable way to reward services to the war effort by civilians at home and servicemen in support positions, King George V created another order with five levels. The first two levels confer knighthood, and since 1935, have not been available to anyone retaining Canadian Citizenship. The three levels - Commander, Officer and Member - have been available to Canadian citizens. The order could be given generously for services to the Empire at home. in India and in the Dominions and colonies. The order was created mainly to award non-combatant services to the war and was to include women, whom most existing orders excluded. When the order was created in 1917 it had only one division, but was divided into Civil and Military divisions in 1918. The order at any level can be awarded for gallantry as well as for service.  The order took an abrupt change in 1937 when the insignia and the colour of the ribbon were changed. 
Military Cross


Captain W. G. Angus, MC
Captain H. T. Carson, MC
Captain Dr. A. F. Graham, MC
Brigadier General J. G. Housser, MC
 

 

Military CrossThe Military Cross can be awarded to commissioned officers of the substantive rank of Captain or below (therefore acting and temporary Majors are eligible) or Warrant Officers for distinguished and meritorious services in battle. In 1920, the terms were altered to clearly state the award was for gallant and distinguished services in action and that naval and air force officers could be awarded the cross for gallant and distinguished services on the ground.
Distinquished Flying Cross

Squadron Leader W. H. Adams, DFC
Flight Lieutenant J. H. Donovan, DFC
Group Captain G. R. McGregor, OBE, DFC
Flying Officer R. E. MacKerrow, DFC
Group Captain J. B. Millward DFC,(& Bar)[Staff]
Flying Officer T. R. Roden, DFC
Flight Lieutenant W. J. Shields, DFC
Flight Lieutenant J. E. Sisman, DFC

 

Distinguished Flying CrossThe cross is awarded to officers and Warrant Officers for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty performed whilst flying in active operations against the enemy. The slip-on bar has an eagle in the centre. The year of the award is engraved on the reverse.  A straight silver bar is awarded for a further act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty whilst flying in active operations against the enemy. The slip-on bar has an eagle in the centre. The year of the award is engraved on the reverse. 
Air Force Cross

Squadron Leader J. F. Barrett, AFC
Group Captain F. C. Carling-Kelly, AFC
Wing Commander N. L. Drynan, AFC, ED

Belgium Croix de GuerreThe cross is awarded to an Officer or a Warrant Officer for an act or acts of valour, courage or devotion to duty whilst flying, but not while in active operations against an enemy.
George Medal

Hume V Cronyn, GM

 

The George Medal was established on 24 September 1940. The medal was awarded only for acts of great bravery and was intended primarily for civilians. Awards to the military were confined to actions for which purely military honours were not normally granted.
Croix de Guerre (French)

Group Captain J. B. Millward, DFC (with Silver Star)
Captain N.D. Slater (with Vermilion Star)
Ralph Otter Geoffrey Morton
Reginald Edward Alfred Morton

French Croix de Guerre with PalmsEstablished in April 8th, 1915  Criteria. During World War I, the French Croix de Guerre was awarded for bravery to military personnel mentioned in dispatches. Recipients of the Légion d'Honneur and Médaille Militaire were automatically entitled to the Croix de Guerre. For subsequent acts of bravery, the recipient was awarded a palm leaf for Army citations, a gold star for Corps citations, a silver star for Division citations or a bronze star for Brigade and Regimental citations.
King's Commendation

Harold Penman Smith
Flight Lieutenant R. W. Wadds

Commended for Valuable Services in the Air
Officer, Legion of Merit
(United States)

William Clement Dick
Lorne C Montgomery

Wing Commander J. L. Walmsely, OBE
 

The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued both to United States military personnel and to military and political figures of foreign governments. The Legion of Merit is one of only two United States decorations to be issued as a neck order (the other being the Medal of Honor), and the only United States decoration which may be issued in award degrees (much like an Order of chivalry or certain Orders of Merit).[1][2]

The Legion of Merit is sixth in the order of precedence of U.S. military decorations, and is worn after the Defense Superior Service Medal and before the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Silver Star (United States)

Captain T. C. Gordon

 

Gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States or while serving with friendly foreign forces.
Bronze Star (United States)

Corporal G. A. Beer
Staff Sergeant D.A. Foerster

Heroic or meritorious achievement or service not involving participation in aerial flight.
Air Medal (United States)

MR Roberts (3 Oak leaf clusters)

The Air Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Armed Forces of the United States, shall have distinguished himself/herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.
Purple Heart (United States)

Petty Officer 1st Class William J. Bullock
Captain Martin Harter
Lieutenant Robert L. Harter

Légion d'honneur (France)

Ralph Otter Geoffrey Morton
Reginald Edward Alfred Morton

Order of the Patriotic War, First Class (USSR)

Lieutenant (N) C. R. A. Senior
 

Distinguished Conduct Medal
Mentioned in Despatches

Brigadier J. F. Bingham, CBE, CD
Captain S. C. Bell
George Drummond Birks

Lieutenant Commander F. E. Burrows

Lieutenant Colonel D. D. Carrick, OBE
Lieutenant Commander N. H. Chapman
Lieutenant Colonel A. G. Chubb
George Taylor Denison (x2)
David Munn Dickie
Flight Lieutenant J. H. Donovan, DFC
Captain D. M. Dunlap
Captain N. P. Fraser
Brigadier J. E. Ganong, ED
Lieutenant R.D. Gowland
Gunner G. W. Hanna
Major I. L. Jennings
Captain E. H. Kates
Lieutenant Colonel C. D. Kingsmill
Brigadier General C. J. Laurin, OBE, OStJ, CD
Flying Officer R. E. MacKerrow, DFC Lieutenant(N) J. G. McClelland
Captain F. F. McEachren
Group Captain G. R. McGregor, DFC, OBE (2x)
Colonel C.A. McIntosh
William Aubrey McIver
Group Captain J. B. Millward [Staff]
Reginald Edward Alfred Morton
Gordon Durham Peace

Lieutenant (N) C. R. A. Senior

John Godfrey Spragge

x